The Misinterpretation of the word 'nansakh' in 2:106

Whichever ayat (miracle) We 'nansakh' or cause to be forgotten, We replace it with that which
is better than it or similar to it. Did you not know that God is Capable of all things?
2:106

The misinterpretation of this word in 2:106 has played a major role in the introduction of the false concept of 'Quranic Abrogation'. For the full details of this subject please see:
The Lie of Quranic Abrogation

The traditional Muslim interpreters interpret the word 'nasakha' to mean abrogate. However, a study of the relevant Quranic verses where this word is used, give a different meaning that in many ways are quite the opposite of the word abrogate.

Before referring to the various Quranic verses where the word "nansakh" has been used, a mention must be given to a key word in 2:106:

Whichever ayat We 'nansakh'
OR cause to be forgotten ....

The use of the word "or" in between the word "nansakh" and the words "cause to be forgotten" indicates that what comes before the word "or" and what comes after this word must be opposite in meaning.

Hence, the word
"nansakh" and the words "cause to be forgotten" must be opposite in meaning. This immediately tells us that the interpretation of "nansakh" as 'abrogate' is incorrect. What is abrogated or invalidated is indeed bound to be forgotten with time, and not the opposite.
It follows that if the correct meaning of "nansakh" was 'abrogated' God would have said:

Whichever ayat We 'nansakh'
and cause to be forgotten ....

A word as small as the word "or" is nevertheless like a sore thumb that exposes the incorrect and misleading interpretation of the word "nansakh".

The word 'nasakha' and its derivatives have been used in four Quranic verses, they are: 2:106, 22:52, 45:29 and 7:154.

FIRST: 45:29

This is Our Book uttering the truth about you. We have been 'nastansikh' what you used to do. 45:29

A simple and effective method of determining the accuracy of the word abrogate is to substitute the word "nastansikh" with the word abrogate:

This is our Book uttering the truth about you. We have been abrogating what you used to do.

Immediately, it becomes evident that the word abrogate is totally out of context with the message of the verse.
First: God records what people do, not abrogate it!
Second: The words "this is our Book" confirm that the word "nastansikh" here means "We have been recording", in the Book.

SECOND: 7:154

When Moses' anger subsided, he took the tablets, and in 'nuskhatiha' (its record/inscription) was guidance and mercy for those who are in awe of their Lord. 7:154

Once again, if we substitute the word "nuskhatiha" with the word (its abrogation) the verse would have no meaning. How can the abrogation of the words of the tablets have guidance? However, if we substitute the word "nuskhatiha" with the word (its record) then the verse would make perfect sense. Consequently, the correct meaning of 7:154 is:

When Moses' anger subsided, he took the tablets, and in its record/inscription was guidance and mercy for those who are in awe of their Lord. 7:154

THIRD: 22:52-53


We did not send before you any messenger, nor a prophet, without the devil attempting to tamper with his wishes. God then records the tampering of the devil and He asserts His revelations. God is Knowledgeable, Wise.
This is in order for Him to set up the tampering of the devil as a test for those who have sickness in their hearts and those whose hearts are hardened. The transgressors are in vast opposition. 22:52-53

Almost all translators fell short when translating the word "yansakh" in 22:52 and translated it as one of the following: abrogate, annul, abolish or cancel out. However, the correct meaning can be attained by reading 22:52 and 22:53.

In 22:52 God tells us that He "yansakh" what the devil has done, then God follows that by saying in 22:53 that He sets what the devil schemed as a test for the ones who harbour doubt in their hearts. Now let us pause here and contemplate on this meaning. If the word "yansakh" means abrogate, nullify or abolish, how can the devil's scheme be a test for those with doubt in their hearts? How can any human be tested by something that has already been nullified? Rather, the devil's schemes and falsehood must be available in order to stand as a test. It is God who allows the devil to whisper his falsehood to humans in the first place. The correct meaning of "yansakh" can only be to record.

FOURTH: 2:106

Finally, when we return to 2:106, we can now discard the incorrect interpretation of the word "nansakh" that gives the meaning of 'abrogate'. The analysis above confirms the correct meaning of the word "nansakh" in 2:106 to be "instate".
The complete verse in its correct translation reads:

Whichever miracle We instate or cause to be forgotten, We replace it with that which is better than it or similar to it. Did you not know that God is Capable of all things? 2:106