Polygamy in the Quran

What does the Quran say about polygamy? Can a man be married to more than one woman at the same time and whenever he pleases?
As will be demonstrated in this article, the Quran sets two clear conditions that must be met before polygamy may be allowed. However, traditional scholars speak only of one condition while totally disregarding the second Quranic condition for polygamy.
The Quranic law for polygamy is found in 4:3. If we start by reading 4:2 first, we note that God is addressing men who are either supporting orphans or acting as guardians to the orphans. The words that follow are:

And if you fear that you may not be just to the orphans, then you may marry whom you please of the women, two, three, or four. But if you fear being unfair, then only one, or what your right hand possesses, for that will make it less likely that you act unfairly.
4:3

1- The word "if" at the beginning of the verse is a conditional word. Therefore, the words "you fear that you may not be just to the orphans", which come after the word "if", are a condition that must be met.
2- If the condition in those words is met, then the words "you may marry whom you please of the women, two, three, or four" that come after the word "then" would be permissible to happen.
The words that follow the word "if" present a condition that must be met.
The words that follow the word "then" present an allowance that is granted once the condition is met.

We derive from the above Quranic words the following:
1- If a man is not supporting orphans, the case of him fearing he may not be just (to orphans) would not apply. Therefore, he would not be entitled to have more than one wife.
2- The above words also tell us that the reason for which God allowed polygamy is none other than the welfare and best interest of the orphans.

The purpose behind the concession of polygamy is therefore strictly connected to men who are supporting orphans and feeling that they may not be doing them justice. Taking a second wife would help in the raising of the orphans, and would also provide the orphans with a mother figure who would offer them the love and care they need. If a man is supporting a larger number of orphans, he may take a third and fourth wife as the need may require.

Sadly, various scholars and imams have misunderstood God's wisdom behind this concession which is decreed for the best interest of the orphans. Instead, they went on to claim that God allowed men more than one wife because men have a higher sexual appetite then women, and other claims which are equally unacceptable!
The following words in 4:3 state that treating the multiple wives fairly is also a condition for polygamy:

If
you fear being unfair, then only one.

While as the ability to be fair is indeed accepted as a condition for polygamy, it is misleading to regard it as the only condition required by God for polygamy.
Just as we see the words "if" and
"then" in the above sentence, we also see the same two words in the first part of the verse which states:

And if you fear that you may not be just to the orphans, then you may marry whom you please of the women, two, three, or four.

To claim that the two words
"if" and "then" (which appear in both sentences) are conditional in one sentence (being fair in treating the wives) but not conditional in the case of supporting orphans and being unjust to them is a case of accepting part of the Quran and rejecting another part.
God warns against doing that:

Do you believe in some of the Scripture and disbelieve in some? So what is the penalty for those among you who do that except disgrace in the worldly life, and to be returned to the most severe punishment on the Day of Resurrection? God is not unaware of what you do. 2:85

Genuine Submitters to the Law of God will give due attention to all the conditions set by God in the Quran and strive to uphold them.

In addition, if supporting orphans is not a condition for polygamy, and men may marry up to four wives at any time as long as they treat the wives equally, then why is God linking the case of supporting orphans with having multiple wives?

This question becomes more relevant when we are reminded that the words,
"you may marry whom you please of the women, two, three, or four"
are not mentioned anywhere else in the Quran. If supporting orphans was not a condition, then there would be no need to link it with polygamy, and specifically, to use the conditional word "if".

Please consider the following example:
A doctor tells his patient:
"If your blood pressure rises above 150/100, then take this medicine, 2, 3, or 4 times a day."
Can we say that high blood pressure is not a condition for taking the medicine and that the patient is free to take the medicine any time he wishes?
If the answer is yes, and the patient is free to take the medicine anytime he wishes, even if his blood pressure is normal, then why is the doctor linking the medicine with high blood pressure? In such a case, the doctor would just say, "Take the medicine any time you wish".